Posts tagged websites

Choose another tag?

After reading Cathy Horyn’s insightful piece about the relevance of the internet and fashion’s somewhat lackadaisical response to this I thought I’d post some screen captures from some of my fave websites. They’re not all fashion or necessarily break the mould but they’re all well executed and give a real sense of what the brand is trying to convey_

www.hermes.com [Perfect – you’d imagine the Hermes site to be so stuffy. It isn’t]


www.gramercyparkhotel.com [You just want to stay there]


www.denhamthejeanmaker.com [Super informative and interactive]


www.thefutureperfect.com [Brooklyn-based store – want it all so badly…]


www.maisonmartinmargiela.com [Wrong but what other way could the Margiela site be?]


www.establishedandsons.com [Witty and approachable for an art world site]


www.vanessabruno.com [Just lovely]

A very interesting article I came across. Check it out.

By CATHY HORYN

Published: December 30, 2009

IN early November, Burberry deployed a new Web site, artofthetrench.com, that presents street-level views of men and women in their trench coats. Scott Schuman, creator of the popular Sartorialist blog, photographed the first batch of images, and then people began submitting their own. “They’re still coming in,” said Sarah Manley, senior vice president for marketing and communications at Burberry. So far, there have been 3.7 million picture views.

Interactive marketing is hardly new, but in creating a digital showcase for its most famous product, Burberry was quickly seen as a Web leader among fashion houses. “The field was wide open for someone to be number one,” said Lucian James, founder of Agenda Inc., a Paris-based brand consulting firm. “You couldn’t have guessed that Burberry would be it.”

Fashion houses, despite their creative clout on the runway, have been surprisingly slow to bring the same level of authority and artistic vision to their Web sites. Selling luxury goods online isn’t the problem — that’s a done deal. Rather, it is that designers and fashion chiefs, the very people who are supposed to predict the future and tell the rest of us what we need, can’t seem to grasp the most obvious aspect of the present: the Web.

Continue reading at: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/12/31/fashion/31NOTEBOOK.html?_r=1